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Most children use a combination of senses to learn. The three most common are visual, auditory (hearing,) and touch or hands-on. Yet, it’s also true that most children tend to be stronger in one of those areas. A simple way to spot your child’s dominant style is by observing him or...

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Observe Your Child to Learn More About His/Her Learning Style

Posted by: Connie McCarthy on Oct 22, 2010 in School Supplies, Parent Involvement, Kids Learning, Fun Learning Activities, Connie McCarthy


Connie McCarthy
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HeadphonesMost children use a combination of senses to learn. The three most common are visual, auditory (hearing,) and touch or "hands-on." Yet, it’s also true that most children tend to be stronger in one of those areas. A simple way to spot your child’s dominant style is by observing him or her in different settings, for example, car trips, going to the library, and home activities.

Your child is probably more of a visual learner if:

  • On car trips he likes to look out the window and play "find" games
  • At the library she goes for the books that are boldly and colorfully illustrated
  • At home he likes looking at photo albums or curling up on the couch with books

Your child is probably more of an auditory learner if:

  • On car trips she likes listening to stories or music with headphones
  • At the library he enjoys the "storytelling" hour, or audio books
  • At home she hears and follows oral directions, likes computer games with songs or sound matching activities.

Your child is probably more of a "hands-on" learner if:

  • On car trips he likes to color in coloring books or draw
  • At the library she goes right for the computer or block/design area, or books that have a tactile component like "Pat the Bunny"
  • At home he likes to take things apart and put them back together, enjoys puzzles or likes doing cooking projects

Knowing your child’s style of learning helps you align activities to that strength.

In the next few weeks I’ll share some easy reading and math activities that will benefit these three different learning styles.

School Family note: For more info on learning styles check out this article:
http://www.schoolfamily.com/school-family-articles/article/826-what-is-your-childs-learning-style
or take the learning style quiz:
http://www.schoolfamily.com/school-family-articles/article/836-learning-styles-quiz.

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Comments

  1. Posted by - carol williams on Oct. 24, 2010

    It would be interesting to learn what determines a child's dominant style of learning, whether environmental or hereditary, and if these patterns continue through adulthood.
    I look forward to future information about this, if possible, as well as the activities so that I can observe this with my grandchildren, as I already know what my children were and appear to be to this day!

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