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Connie McCarthy is passionate about her work as a teacher of young children. She has devoted her entire career to making sure that her students do well at school, right from the start. Connie has an undergraduate degree in Elementary Education, and a Master’s Degree in Special Education. She has been teaching first grade in East Providence, R.I. for 23 years, where she received the distinction of “Highly Qualified Teacher” by the Rhode Island State Board of Regents. Connie also taught nursery school for four years, and published numerous articles on early education in East Bay Newspapers in Bristol, R.I. She’s also been published in PTO Today Magazine. She lives with her husband, Brian, and has a daughter and a son, both young adults. Connie enjoys reading, writing about elementary education, and taking long walks with friends. During summer vacations, she likes to travel with her husband. She also loves reading readers’ comments on her weekly blog posts.

Help Your Auditory Learner with Reading and Math Skills

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DrumsYour auditory learner is usually a good listener. This is the child who says "But Mom you said...!" They are the children who follow spoken directions, love rhymes, music, listening to stories or listening to audio books. They need a quiet spot to work and love wearing headphones that block out other noises. You can tap into this learning style with the following easy ideas and activities.

Reading and Spelling:

  • Read to your child as much as possible. When your child begins to read encourage their reading out loud to you or an older sibling. Hearing the flow and rhythm of their voice is beneficial to increasing reading fluency.
  • Introduce letter sounds or spelling words using one of your child’s favorite songs or rhymes. For example, in our class we do a vowel song to the tune of "Skip to My Lou."
  • If you have a child friendly recorder, (Fisher Price for example) help your child use it to study spelling words. Record the list of words in this order; "Say it, spell it, say it." Study by playing back the words for practice, until the Spelling Test.


  • Have your child count out loud while pointing to the numbers on a calendar or number grid. Make sure to practice counting forward and backward!
  • Practice math with a small drum, pan or wooden spoons. Say a number and have your child "tap it out" to hear the sounds of the count. To increase the difficulty say a number, then ask him to "tap-out" the number before, or the number after.
  • Play a clapping game with numbers. Have your child shut their eyes. Say "Tell me how many claps you hear." After listening to your claps, have your child tell you the total number. For addition practice, clap three times, pause then clap two more. Ask, "How many claps all together?" Continue with your own number variations.


#2 Lynn C 2010-11-13 15:12
Challenging ideas-- I like it!
#1 Livia McCoy 2010-11-05 23:32
These are great ideas for helping auditory learners!

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Do you allow your children to watch TV or play on the computer before doing their homework?