Schoolfamily.com - Helping parents help their kids succeed at school

Your auditory learner is usually a good listener. This is the child who says But Mom you said...! They are the children who follow spoken directions, love rhymes, music, listening to stories or listening to audio books. They need a quiet spot to work and love wearing headphones that block out...

Advertisement




RSS feed for School Family Blog Subscribe to SchoolFamily.com Blog Updates

Enter your email address to receive new blog postings via email:

 

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advertisement

Pick a Blog Topic


Help Your Auditory Learner with Reading and Math Skills

Posted by: Connie McCarthy on Nov 05, 2010 in School Success, Parent Involvement, Kids Reading, Kids Math, Kids Learning, Fun Learning Activities, Connie McCarthy


Connie McCarthy
Bio

DrumsYour auditory learner is usually a good listener. This is the child who says "But Mom you said...!" They are the children who follow spoken directions, love rhymes, music, listening to stories or listening to audio books. They need a quiet spot to work and love wearing headphones that block out other noises. You can tap into this learning style with the following easy ideas and activities.

Reading and Spelling:

  • Read to your child as much as possible. When your child begins to read encourage their reading out loud to you or an older sibling. Hearing the flow and rhythm of their voice is beneficial to increasing reading fluency.
  • Introduce letter sounds or spelling words using one of your child’s favorite songs or rhymes. For example, in our class we do a vowel song to the tune of "Skip to My Lou."
  • If you have a child friendly recorder, (Fisher Price for example) help your child use it to study spelling words. Record the list of words in this order; "Say it, spell it, say it." Study by playing back the words for practice, until the Spelling Test.

Math:

  • Have your child count out loud while pointing to the numbers on a calendar or number grid. Make sure to practice counting forward and backward!
  • Practice math with a small drum, pan or wooden spoons. Say a number and have your child "tap it out" to hear the sounds of the count. To increase the difficulty say a number, then ask him to "tap-out" the number before, or the number after.
  • Play a clapping game with numbers. Have your child shut their eyes. Say "Tell me how many claps you hear." After listening to your claps, have your child tell you the total number. For addition practice, clap three times, pause then clap two more. Ask, "How many claps all together?" Continue with your own number variations.
AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Comments

  1. Posted by - Lynn C on Nov. 13, 2010

    Challenging ideas-- I like it!
  2. avatar

    Posted by LiviaMcCoy on Nov. 05, 2010

    These are great ideas for helping auditory learners!

Add Comment