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Your Hands-On learner is the child who can put things together, or take them apart. This is the child whose favorite activity is blocks, clay, Legos, or digging. They are the children, who at the end of the day have the dirtiest hands, face, and clothes! They need to move when working, and b...

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Help Your "Hands-On" Learner with Reading and Math Skills

Posted by: Connie McCarthy on Nov 11, 2010 in School Success, Parent Involvement, Kids Reading, Kids Math, Kids Learning, Fun Learning Activities, Extracurricular Activities, Connie McCarthy


Connie McCarthy
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Your "Hands-On" learner is the child who can put things together, or take them apart. This is the child whose favorite activity is blocks, clay, Legos, or digging. They are the children, who at the end of the day have the dirtiest hands, face, and clothes! They need to move when working, and be able to "touch and feel" what they are learning.

Reading and Spelling

  • Have your child close his eyes. Practice letters or spelling words by "writing" them on your child’s back. With your index finger trace a letter or word on their back, over a shirt or pajama top. Your child can guess the letter or word by "feeling" the letters. Let them have a turn writing a letter or word on your back.
  • Roll out thin strips of clay or play dough and use them to form letters. Once your child knows the letters roll out more to form simple words.
  • Have her use a highlight marker in magazines or books she owns, to find words in stories. For example, highlight all the words the start with the "Bb" sound on a page. Or, highlight the short "a" words.

Math

  • Use Legos or colored blocks to create patterns. Start with a two-step pattern, for example place a red, then blue, red, blue, etc. Then increase to a three-step or more sequence.
  • Roll a pair of dice and count the dots on each die for simple addition. Help your child write the number sentence that goes with the roll. For example, if he rolls a six and a two write: 6+2=8.
  • Put some pennies and nickels in a brown lunch bag. Have your child put her hand in the bag, without looking, and grab one of the coins. Have her guess the coin by feeling it. Take it out. If she guessed correctly she can keep it. When the coins are all out of the bag count the nickels by 5’s and the pennies by 1’s for the total.
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Comments

  1. Posted by - Lynn C on Nov. 13, 2010

    Love these suggestions! Great ideas. Thank you!

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