Schoolfamily.com - Helping parents help their kids succeed at school

Being a good reader does not necessarily mean that a child will be a good writer. Writing stories is a learned skill, and sometimes the best readers are reluctant writers. The key is to start simply, so that the art of writing is not overwhelming to a young child. Here are three simple ideas to...

Advertisement




RSS feed for School Family Blog Subscribe to SchoolFamily.com Blog Updates

Enter your email address to receive new blog postings via email:

 

Delivered by FeedBurner

Advertisement

Pick a Blog Topic


Turn Your Good Reader into a Good Writer

Posted by: Connie McCarthy on Feb 02, 2011 in Parent Involvement, Kids Writing, Kids Learning, Fun Learning Activities, Extracurricular Activities, Connie McCarthy


Connie McCarthy
Bio

Being a good reader does not necessarily mean that a child will be a good writer. Writing stories is a learned skill, and sometimes the best readers are reluctant writers. The key is to start simply, so that the art of writing is not overwhelming to a young child. Here are three simple ideas to help your young child become a comfortable writer:

  • Writing is part of life. From lists, memos, to e-mails, we write every day for a variety of reasons. Share the different methods of everyday writing and encourage your child to become an everyday writer. For example, have her write a "to-do" list for getting ready for school, a list of items that should always be in her backpack, or help her send an e-mail to a relative.

  • Let your child choose cute cards, or postcards to use as "Thank You" notes to family and friends. Not only will this give your child writing practice, it will brighten Grandma’s day!

  • Keep a notebook handy for your child to write easy, non-fiction stories from your family life. For example, when your child says "It was fun at the zoo today," ask "Why don’t you draw a picture of what you liked best?" When their picture is complete, ask questions about it. "What animal is that?" "What did you like about that animal?" Have your child write their answers underneath the picture, or you can scribe it for very young children. Remember to date the page. Then have your child read their words back to you. This can progress from one or two simple sentences to eventually filling the notebook with complete stories about their experiences.
AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Comments

  1. avatar

    Posted by Letter Box on Mar. 19, 2012

    Great ideas, thank you
  2. Posted by - Lynn Clarke on Feb. 04, 2011

    Thanks for publishing these tips! E has just begun to show a real interest in making lists and labeling pictures. I plan to encourage a lot more of that, and see if we can make a book together.
  3. Posted by - carol williams on Feb. 03, 2011

    Labeling the animals drawn in a notebook is a marvelous idea, and having them read their own words back at a later date, like their own "book" also sounds fun and effective, too.
    Wish I'd thought of that one!

Add Comment