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This week we are excited to have a guest blog authored by Clare McIlwraith and Chris Whittington, a.k.a The Study Gurus. This dynamic duo specializes in teaching students how to study effectively.  Their aim is to show parents how they can help their teens reach their academic potential at ...

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How to Help Your Teen Crush Procrastination Once & For All

Posted by: SchoolFamily on Sep 21, 2011 in School Success, Parent Involvement, Kids Learning, Homework


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Study Gurus

This week we are excited to have a guest blog authored by Clare McIlwraith and Chris Whittington, a.k.a The Study Gurus. This dynamic duo specializes in teaching students how to study effectively.  Their aim is to show parents how they can help their teens reach their academic potential at high school. They’re sharing their years of studying and tutoring experience at www.thestudygurus.com.

 

It is important for both parents and students to understand that all of our actions boil down to what's going on upstairs. Our brains need reasons to do things.

Your teen won't put in the study hours they need to, unless they have the reasons why they should.

As a parent, you already know the reasons why...

  • You want your teen to leave high school with good grades.
  • You want them to have good grades so that they have lots of options available to them when they finish school
  • You want them to have lots of options available because they may not decide on a firm career for some time after they leave school

You want the best for them, and you understand that this will largely depend on them doing well at high school.

Does your teen have their own reasons?

Not doing so will only amplify their procrastination.

To get around this they need to have a good hard think (and probably have a good chat with you) about why it's important for them to do well at school.

They need to be important reasons too. Not just "Mum and Dad will get mad if I don't study". They need to reasons that relate to their life and their future.

Make sure they include reasons why they should do well, as well as reasons why they shouldn't do badly. This is because the thought of not getting into the college they want, not going into the career they want, will be much more powerful motivators than ‘getting good grades'.

Things like:

  • I need to study hard so I get into vet school when I leave high school
  • I need good marks to get into a good college
  • If I get bad marks I might end up taking orders in a drive-thru
  • I need good marks so I end up with a career that I love

And make sure you write all of their own reasons down and stick them up in a prominent place!

The answers they come up with extremely useful procrastination crushers when they aren't in much of a studying mood.

For more information on procrastination and how to motivate your teen, head on over to The Study Gurus website.

 

 

 

The Study Gurus have a video program that gives students a range of techniques to deal with procrastination problems. Find out more about the Motivation and Procrastination Package here.

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