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National standards have set the bar for academic achievement, which means that today it is clear what a student should have achieved by certain points in the school year. Parent teacher conferences are a terrific opportunity for parents to get an accurate picture of their child’s academic a...

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6 Questions for a Successful Parent Teacher Conference

Posted by: Connie McCarthy on Dec 05, 2011 in SchoolFamily.com, Parenting, Parent-Teacher Conference, Parent Involvement, Kindergarten, Kids Learning, Elementary School, Connie McCarthy


Connie McCarthy
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National standards have set the bar for academic achievement, which means that today it is clear what a student should have achieved by certain points in the school year.

Parent teacher conferences are a terrific opportunity for parents to get an accurate picture of their child’s academic achievement and how he is functioning in the classroom. The key to a successful parent teacher conference is to maximize the exchange of information, in a limited amount of time.

Here are 6 important questions for parents to ask at conferences for students in kindergarten, and 1st and 2nd grade:

 

  • At this point in the school year, what is the expected reading level?  Is my child on level?

 

  • Are my child’s math skills meeting the standards?

 

  • What can I do, as a parent, to enhance my child’s academic progress in reading and math?

 

  • How does my child interact socially with classmates? Does this behavior affect his/her academics?

 

  • What do you see as my child’s strengths?

 

  • What is the preferred way to communicate?  (Email, phone calls, notes, etc., and what is a typical response time?)

 

 

Parents should also remember to:

 

  • Bring a notebook and take notes, so that you can remember what was discussed and any important suggestions made by the teacher.

 

  • Let the teacher know of any changes at home that could affect academics, such as the arrival of a new baby, a job loss, etc.

 

Finally, remember that you and your child’s teacher want the same thing—a successful and happy school year for your child!

 

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Comments

  1. Posted by - Elisa Zavala on Mar. 01, 2013

    Thanks good questions

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