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 A few years ago, when I was introducing word categories to my 1st grade students, I asked if anyone knew what a “synonym” was. I called on one student who was enthusiastically waving his hand. “Oh yes,” he said. “I know, I know. ‘Synonym’ is what y...

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A "Synonym" is Not Something You Put on Toast!

Posted by: Connie McCarthy on Mar 20, 2012 in Teachers, SchoolFamily.com, School Success, Parent Involvement, Kindergarten, Kids Writing, Kids Reading, Kids Learning, Fun Learning Activities, Elementary School, Connie McCarthy


Connie McCarthy
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 A few years ago, when I was introducing word categories to my 1st grade students, I asked if anyone knew what a “synonym” was. I called on one student who was enthusiastically waving his hand. “Oh yes,” he said. “I know, I know. ‘Synonym’ is what you put on toast with butter!”

 I couldn’t help but smile as I started my lesson.

Three categories of words can make creative writing more exciting and interesting for your young child. They are: antonyms, synonyms, and homophones.

Antonyms are words with opposite meanings.  Day and night, up and down, and stop and go, are three examples.  They are important words to know when writing, because knowing opposites automatically doubles your child’s vocabulary! Children as young as 3 years old can grasp the concept of opposites…and love to recite them for you.

Synonyms are words that have the same meaning. Small and little, happy and glad, large and big are all synonyms. Knowing synonyms can help an emerging writer avoid using the same words over and over again in a story.

Homophones are words that sound alike, but have different definitions and spellings. One and won, two and too, days and daze are some examples. “Dear Deer:  A Book of Homophones” by Gene Barretta is a great story. It uses homophones and animal characters in a comical way to reinforce the concept.

 

Understanding different word choices can often turn a reluctant writer into a creative and confident one! For more reading and writing practice, see our printables for Grade 1-2.

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Comments

  1. Posted by - Riley Roam on Mar. 26, 2012

    I laughed when I read this!!!!

    We actually created a video for kids called Cinnamon Synonyms!

    You can see it here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbIcopsQDT8&feature=youtu.be

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