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It’s widely known that parents who are actively involved in their child’s reading activities can significantly increase their child’s literacy. Here are eight simple strategies you can use to encourage good literacy in your young student, which can greatly help him become a more...

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8 Simple Ways To Encourage Your Child’s Literacy

Posted by: Connie McCarthy on Sep 03, 2013 in Kids Reading, Connie McCarthy, Back to School


Connie McCarthy
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It’s widely known that parents who are actively involved in their child’s reading activities can significantly increase their child’s literacy.

Here are eight simple strategies you can use to encourage good literacy in your young student, which can greatly help him become a more advanced and comprehensive reader.

  • Model reading. Let your child see you read, often. Reading books, newspapers, directions, recipes, maps, etc. subtly reinforces the necessity of good reading in everyday life.
  • When reading together, help him distinguish clearly between fiction and nonfiction.
  • Before reading to her, take a “picture walk” through the book and have her predict what that page might be about.
  • When reading to him, stop and ask questions to check comprehension.
  • Help her visualize. After reading a story, ask her to close her eyes and make a picture in her mind about the best part of the story, or her favorite character, etc. Then let her describe that to you. This helps make reading more “three-dimensional.”
  • Help him make a “self-to-text” connection. For example, if the story has a character that was brave you might ask him to tell you about a time that he felt brave. Then say, “So you really know how that character was feeling!”
  • After reading a story together, ask him to think of a different ending for the story. This helps make the story more personal and memorable.
  • Make a reading-to-writing connection. Have her use a notebook to keep a reading journal. On the top of a page have her write, or write for her, the name of the book, author, and date read. Then help her write a brief synopsis of the story. It’s always fun for a child to go back and see how much they have read!

 

> Teach Your Child To Love Reading

> Do a Reading Survey With Your Child

 

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