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Young students can be reluctant story writers, even when they are good readers. However, understanding a simple sequence often gives them the confidence to give writing a try. This is a basic writing sequence that’s been successfully used by many teachers over the years. First we learn let...

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A Simple Sequence for Helping Children Write Stories

Posted by: Connie McCarthy on Oct 29, 2013 in Kids Writing, Kids Learning, Connie McCarthy


Connie McCarthy
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Young students can be reluctant story writers, even when they are good readers. However, understanding a simple sequence often gives them the confidence to give writing a try. This is a basic writing sequence that’s been successfully used by many teachers over the years.

  • First we learn letters
  • Letters make words
  • Words make sentences
  • And sentences make a story


This sounds so simple! Yet from a young child’s point of view it clarifies why he has to learn all this new (and seemingly unrelated) information.

To help your child:

  • Practice letter recognition with letter “partners” like Bb. This is more practical and helps make an easier transition to print.
  • With index cards, label objects around your child’s bedroom in lowercase letters. While lying in bed, she can “read around her the room” (window, chair, closet, floor, door, etc.).
  • Once she can easily read the words around her room, turn the words into sentences with additional index cards. For example, “Here is a window.” “I see a closet.” “This is a desk.” “I like my bed.”
  • When she can read the sentences with ease, help her create a simple story using one of the sentences as a story starter. For example, “I like my bed because it’s so soft. Sometimes I read in it. Sometimes I jump on it! I can stand on my bed and look out the window. I like having a nice bed!” Then she could illustrate her story. 

 

The more a young child understands how this basic writing sequence works, the more likely she will learn to love writing.

> Helping Good Readers Become Good Writers

> Help Your Child Build Writing Skills

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