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It is a proven fact that constant reading to young children helps them become better readers. Why is this so effective? Children learn many skills as they listen. Listening is the first step your child takes in making literacy connections. Educators call this emergent reading. Just as you supp...

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Why Reading To Your Child Is So Important!

Posted by: Connie McCarthy on Jul 23, 2009 in Kids Reading, Connie McCarthy


Connie McCarthy
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It is a proven fact that constant reading to young children helps them become better readers. Why is this so effective?
Children learn many skills as they listen. Listening is the first step your child takes in making literacy connections. Educators call this "emergent reading." Just as you supported your infant before they could walk, you are supporting their reading abilities by reading to them until they can do it on their own. You are increasing their interest in the printed word, building vocabulary, and encouraging exploration.
Understanding your child's learning strength is essential in helping them begin to read. Reading to your child can help you determine their best method of learning. Most children use a combination of visual, listening and tactile senses to learn. However, usually one of these senses is dominant.
If your child is a visual learner, he will probably focus on the pictures in the story. One of the best ways to help this child learn to read is to have him pay attention to the picture clues. Sounding out words can become easier if there is a visual clue to match the print.
If your child learns best by listening, she is probably an auditory learner. She might revisit the same story again and again, because she recalls the words. "She's not really reading, she's just memorized the story" is a concern I often hear from parents. This is a good thing! She is making an auditory connection to the printed word, and will start to sound out what she is seeing.
If your child is a "hands-on" learner you may want to share books that have a tactile component like: "Pat the Bunny" by Dorothy Kunhardt, or "The Very Busy Spider" by Eric Carle. Holding the book and having textures to touch will help this child connect the printed word to what they are touching.
Knowing how your child learns can help improve their reading skills, increase comprehension, and foster a "life-long" love of reading!
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Comments

  1. Posted by - Martha on Aug. 20, 2009

    I now understand that my child is an auditory reader; I am pleased that this is a good thing and that memorizing a story that she enjoys is a step in the direction of word recognition. Thank you
  2. Posted by - Sound Reading on Jul. 27, 2009

    Very true.

    Children read and watch movies because they are interested in the story, and reading to your children will show them that a book can be just as interesting as a movie. Even ignoring the fact that listening is closely related to reading, it may help them to be more interested in reading, therefore reading more and getting better at it.
  3. Posted by - Anne Nicotero on Jul. 26, 2009

    I agree that reading to your children is so important.

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