SchoolFamily Voices

Connie McCarthy is passionate about her work as a teacher of young children. She has devoted her entire career to making sure that her students do well at school, right from the start. Connie has an undergraduate degree in Elementary Education, and a Master’s Degree in Special Education. She has been teaching first grade in East Providence, R.I. for 23 years, where she received the distinction of “Highly Qualified Teacher” by the Rhode Island State Board of Regents. Connie also taught nursery school for four years, and published numerous articles on early education in East Bay Newspapers in Bristol, R.I. She’s also been published in PTO Today Magazine. She lives with her husband, Brian, and has a daughter and a son, both young adults. Connie enjoys reading, writing about elementary education, and taking long walks with friends. During summer vacations, she likes to travel with her husband. She also loves reading readers’ comments on her weekly blog posts.

Improve Your Young Child's Drawing and Handwriting Skills

Posted by on
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Hits: 6803
  • 1 Comment
  • Subscribe to this entry
  • Print

In my last post I shared some simple activities that can help your young child improve cutting skills. Today's games are very effective in improving your child's drawing and handwriting skills.

  • Fill a shirt-sized cardboard box top with sand or salt. (Don’t use sugar because your child might be tempted to eat it!) Have your child practice writing letters of the alphabet with her index finger, making sure to practice both uppercase and lowercase letters. Once your child masters the letters, give her an unsharpened pencil to use in the sand or salt. She can trace her name and simple words. You can write a word in the sand or salt and have her copy it underneath your model. This is a great rainy day activity!
  • Use a highlight marker to print letters, names, words, etc. on a piece of paper. (Use any color high lighter except yellow. Yellow is too light.) Have your child write inside the highlight color with a pencil. This gives your child a distinct border in which to work, yet allows him to clearly see his own writing.
  • Take an old cookie sheet. Fill it with a thin layer of shaving cream. Give your child a Q-Tip or unsharpened pencil and let her draw and print in the shaving cream. (This is a fun bathtub activity!)
  • Use your driveway or sidewalk as a giant slate, and let your child use colored chalk to create pictures. This is an excellent way to enhance fine motor skills in a larger setting and the pictures will last until the next rainfall!


#1 Dr. Brandon Ford 2010-01-31 23:58
It's! a great idea to have children of all ages to do that.

Add comment...


Do you allow your children to watch TV or play on the computer before doing their homework?