SchoolFamily Voices

Connie McCarthy is passionate about her work as a teacher of young children. She has devoted her entire career to making sure that her students do well at school, right from the start. Connie has an undergraduate degree in Elementary Education, and a Master’s Degree in Special Education. She has been teaching first grade in East Providence, R.I. for 23 years, where she received the distinction of “Highly Qualified Teacher” by the Rhode Island State Board of Regents. Connie also taught nursery school for four years, and published numerous articles on early education in East Bay Newspapers in Bristol, R.I. She’s also been published in PTO Today Magazine. She lives with her husband, Brian, and has a daughter and a son, both young adults. Connie enjoys reading, writing about elementary education, and taking long walks with friends. During summer vacations, she likes to travel with her husband. She also loves reading readers’ comments on her weekly blog posts.

Help Improve Your Child’s Memory

Good visual and memory skills can help your child be successful in school. You can help improve these skills with a simple, fun activity that takes about ten to twenty minutes. This game can be played on a flat surface at home, such as a tabletop, floor, or bed. With summer here, you can also play this game on a blanket at the beach, or pool!

To do this activity you will need:

  • An assortment of small household items. For example, pencil, eraser, marker, small toy, hairbrush, shoe, slipper, etc.
  • If you are at the beach or pool you can use items from your beach bag. For example, a shovel, pail, lotion tube, flip-flop, sand toy, book etc.

How to play:

  • Select a few items and lay them on the flat surface. For younger children, age three to four, start with no more than four items. Increase the items as your child’s memory gets sharper. For older children, age five to seven, start with six items and build up to more.
  • Once your items are on a flat surface, let your child carefully study them for a minute. Tell your child to turn their back, and close their eyes.
  • Take away one of the items, and hide it behind you.
  • See if your child can guess what’s missing!
  • As your child’s memory gets better, increase the difficulty. Take away two items, then three or more.
  • Have a turn yourself, and let your child trick you!

Simple activities like these can increase your child’s ability to focus and pay attention to detail.

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#1 Beth P. 2010-06-04 02:58
Thank you for taking the time to work with me in your classroom, your ideas are so clever and creative and I can't wait to use many of them in my classroom. My observation hours in your classroom showed much of the same behavior management and creativity you show here. I really hope I can come back and visit soon!
Keep inspiring :]
Much appreciation,
Beth Paradis

P.S I tried sending you a thank you note in the mail and it got sent back to me, something about my college's mail system is slow and painful. I'll try to resend.

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