logo

SchoolFamily Voices

Join our bloggers as they share their experiences on the challenges and joys of helping children succeed in school.

How to Help Children Increase Reading Connections

A girl with bookYoung readers enjoy stories more when they can relate to characters, settings, or actions of the plot. Teachers call this a "self-to-text" connection. Children envision it as being "part" of the story.

Making a "self-to-text" connection in reading enhances comprehension and memory of the story. The more "self-to-text" connections a child can make, the greater their understanding of the story.

One of the best ways to help your child increase reading connections is to give them lots of "background knowledge." For example, by taking your child to special places like the zoo, the beach, the library or a science museum, etc., you can enrich and enlarge your child’s life experiences. That can help a child understand what they read.

Connections to everyday life increase your child’s prior knowledge as well. Going to the grocery store, car wash, gas station, doing laundry, cooking, etc. can help a child relate to what is happening in a story.

For example, if your child has a favorite pet, he would probably enjoy reading stories about having a pet, such as the "Henry and Mudge" series. If your child likes knowing about the weather, she might enjoy "Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs."

If a young child first discovers an interest, then makes a reading connection, the result will be greater reading comprehension and enjoyment.

5 Ways To Help Your Teen Get Fantastic Exam Result...
Making Sense of Notes Taken on the Computer

Related Posts

Comments   

#1 Jeff 2011-05-31 17:20
I've tried this before and it works great. Many places that you visit have bookstores on premise like museums and the zoo where you can buy books with related content. After the visit we always stop in their bookstore and see what books relate to things we just saw. This is a great way to match everything up and we don't have to hunt for related books later online or at a local bookstore.

You have no rights to post comments

School Family Connection Newsletter

Get school tips, recipes, worksheets, and more

First Name
Email *
Yes, send offers from carefully selected partners.
(* = required field)

Advertisement
Advertisement

Do you allow your children to watch TV or play on the computer before doing their homework?

No - 37.4%
Sometimes - 25.4%
Yes - 31.6%

Total votes: 4919
The voting for this poll has ended on: June 25, 2016