SchoolFamily Voices

Connie McCarthy is passionate about her work as a teacher of young children. She has devoted her entire career to making sure that her students do well at school, right from the start. Connie has an undergraduate degree in Elementary Education, and a Master’s Degree in Special Education. She has been teaching first grade in East Providence, R.I. for 23 years, where she received the distinction of “Highly Qualified Teacher” by the Rhode Island State Board of Regents. Connie also taught nursery school for four years, and published numerous articles on early education in East Bay Newspapers in Bristol, R.I. She’s also been published in PTO Today Magazine. She lives with her husband, Brian, and has a daughter and a son, both young adults. Connie enjoys reading, writing about elementary education, and taking long walks with friends. During summer vacations, she likes to travel with her husband. She also loves reading readers’ comments on her weekly blog posts.

Practice Writing Skills With Thanksgiving Notes

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Young students should be able to write, or at least copy, short notes. What better opportunity to hone their writing skills than sending thank-you notes in the days prior to Thanksgiving?  

Brighten someone’s day by helping your child send a simple, handwritten thank-you note.  What could be more heartwarming than receiving a personal note from a young student who is just learning how to write?

Likely recipients could be:


“Thank you for being a wonderful grandmother. Happy Thanksgiving!”

Aunts or uncles:

“Thank you for being a special uncle. Happy Thanksgiving!”

Friendly pediatrician or dentist:

“Thank you for taking such good care of me. Happy Thanksgiving!”

Local police officer or firefighter:

“Thank you for watching over us. Happy Thanksgiving!”

Neighborhood mail carrier:

“Thank you for your hard work. Happy Thanksgiving!”

Special neighbors:

“Thank you for being a wonderful neighbor. Happy Thanksgiving!”

Don’t forget teachers:

“Thank you for teaching me how to write. Happy Thanksgiving!”

The list can go on…

In addition to helping your child practice her writing skills, you will be strongly reinforcing the true meaning of Thanksgiving.  It’s not about turkey dinners and football games; it’s about families gathering together and giving thanks for their blessings.

Thank you, School Family readers, for your interest in my writing…Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

Printable Thanksgiving-theme postcards


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Do you allow your children to watch TV or play on the computer before doing their homework?