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So my 2nd grader just came home with a bad report card. Not sure how to handle it. My older two have done fine in school... To tell you the truth I don't know how to react or where to start!




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Question: Report Card help

So my 2nd grader just came home with a bad report card. Not sure how to handle it. My older two have done fine in school... To tell you the truth I don't know how to react or where to start!


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Advice from School Family and Our Experts

SchoolFamily writes:
Liz- To answer your question, I would start by asking some questions: what is a bad report card? Did your teacher give you a head's up to any problems? Without knowing how your report card is structured I would offer this. Kids are a work in progress. As a parent I am always more concerned with comments about effort than actual letter grades. Also suggest focusing your conversations with your son in this direction as well. A child who struggles with reading and writing in 2nd grade can be an honors English student in high school. Because some things take longer to click with some kids, it's best to stay focused on hard work. If in fact you were caught off guard by "bad grades", I would set up a meeting with the teacher right away. There should be an open dialog between teachers and parents if there are any issues - not just at report card time. Try to get specific and concrete areas where you son needs help. Finally, if you have not shown the report card to your son yet, I personally would not advise it. The last thing you want is for him to internalize that he is "not good in math", for example, because he may just stop trying. Good luck!
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Advice from School Family and Our Experts

SchoolFamily writes:
Liz- Here is an article about dealing with disappointing grades.
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Community Advice

luv2teach writes:
As a teacher, I certainly agree with the above comment about discussing it with your child's teacher. Most teachers keep parents abreast of concerns and areas where their child may be struggling. A conference with all 3 of you---parent, teacher, AND child can be extremely helpful. I disagree however, with keeping the report card from your child. A child needs to know where improvement is needed, and also that by working together as a team, that you are all there to help. Encouragement is a must, but not being truthful about the situation will only make matters worse.
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Community Advice

Soumahoro writes:
First, I would set up a meeting with his teacher,because they are in the classroom, then I would take my child to get a neuropsychological testing. Please inform your child as well as the school that you will get him help.My daughter had problems, and now she has graduated from college. Now my son has reading problems, and we are getting help for him so he can go to college. Early assessment is important so the school can make accomodations to help the child. The school can intensive intervention to see how the child is progressing. Best Wishes
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Community Advice

Soumahoro writes:
First, I would set up a meeting with his teacher,because they are in the classroom, then I would take my child to get a neuropsychological testing. Please inform your child as well as the school that you will get him help.My daughter had problems, and now she has graduated from college. Now my son has reading problems, and we are getting help for him so he can go to college. Early assessment is important so the school can make accomodations to help the child. The school can intensive intervention to see how the child is progressing. Best Wishes
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Community Advice

Soumahoro writes:
First, I would set up a meeting with his teacher,because they are in the classroom, then I would take my child to get a neuropsychological testing. Please inform your child as well as the school that you will get him help.My daughter had problems, and now she has graduated from college. Now my son has reading problems, and we are getting help for him so he can go to college. Early assessment is important so the school can make accomodations to help the child. The school can intensive intervention to see how the child is progressing. Best Wishes
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Community Advice

mommo7 writes:
Hi, I teach daycare, school-aged, and we are trying to design our own map, what materials would I need to get this project started?
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Community Advice

bbbKatieinCanada writes:
Hi I have three children. My middle child (boy) I remember him receiving a "Not Great" report card in grade two also. I thought it was sooo strange he struggled more than his older sister for English. I mentioned this to the teacher during our parent-teacher interview. She reassured me that he was doing okay and remember not to compare him to his older sister, that they are totally two different children. I always knew as a mom, I never wanted to compare my kids to each other, because they are definitely different from one another......but I lost site of that. My son is now in grade 6. He struggles with English but a whiz at Math and very studious. It may be nothing, but I would make sure to talk with his teacher. Let us know how it goes.
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