SchoolFamily Voices

Connie McCarthy is passionate about her work as a teacher of young children. She has devoted her entire career to making sure that her students do well at school, right from the start. Connie has an undergraduate degree in Elementary Education, and a Master’s Degree in Special Education. She has been teaching first grade in East Providence, R.I. for 23 years, where she received the distinction of “Highly Qualified Teacher” by the Rhode Island State Board of Regents. Connie also taught nursery school for four years, and published numerous articles on early education in East Bay Newspapers in Bristol, R.I. She’s also been published in PTO Today Magazine. She lives with her husband, Brian, and has a daughter and a son, both young adults. Connie enjoys reading, writing about elementary education, and taking long walks with friends. During summer vacations, she likes to travel with her husband. She also loves reading readers’ comments on her weekly blog posts.

Three Easy Activities to Improve Reading Skills

Posted by on
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Hits: 7994
  • Subscribe to this entry
  • Print

"Mrs. McCarthy," said one of my students,  "I'd like to read...I just don't know where to start!"  Young students often don't understand the left-to-right progression needed for reading.   Here are three simple activities to help your child practice and develop good reading habits.


  1. As you read a story to your child, move your index finger in a left-to-right sweep, under the words you are saying.This helps her identify words and understand the natural left-to-right progression necessary for reading.

  2. As your child reads a story, let him hold a small index card under the line being read.This helps to keep his eyes focused on the specific sentence and words he is reading.

  3. After you have finished reading a story, go back and find one line from the story that you both liked.Let your child use their finger to play a “mystery hunt” game with that particular line. Start at the left. Ask your child to find all the words in that line that start with “b,” for example. Say the words as she finds them. Go back to the beginning of the line then ask her to find all the words that end with “t.” Continue with other variations, or different lines from the story. This activity reinforces the visual/sound connection.


#2 malihanaheed 2012-04-20 20:04
helpful tips thanks
#1 vitamine  2009-11-09 11:30
You have given very nice tips about improve reading skills.Some child does not like to read.This will be very useful for children.Thank you very much for giving such a good information to us.

Add comment...


Do you allow your children to watch TV or play on the computer before doing their homework?