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If your child is learning disabled, now is the time to make contact with his or her new teachers. Speaking from a teacher’s perspective, the beginning of the school year is extremely hectic! It is very easy to overlook something important—like reading a student’s IEP in order ...

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How to Advocate for Your Child with Learning Disabilities at the Beginning of the School Year

Posted by: Livia McCoy on Sep 13, 2011 in Parent Involvement, Livia McCoy, Learning Disabilities, Back to School


Livia McCoy
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Boy and TeacherIf your child is learning disabled, now is the time to make contact with his or her new teachers. Speaking from a teacher’s perspective, the beginning of the school year is extremely hectic! It is very easy to overlook something important—like reading a student’s IEP in order to know what I need to be doing for that child to ensure success in my class. I have heard that in some large schools, it is weeks into the school year before every teacher is even notified that a particular student has an IEP.

The National Center for Learning Disabilities offers excellent advice for how to advocate for your child and establish a positive relationship with your child’s teachers.

Remember--teachers like kids and want to help them. (They would not be teachers if they did not!) But, they have lots of new students all at once, and it can be very difficult to figure out who needs what.

Read the Back to School Parent Toolkit to learn how to effectively advocate for your child.

If your child struggles in school but does not have an IEP, there are many wonderful resources here at SchoolFamily.com that may help you figure out what to do.

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Comments

  1. Posted by - Johnathan on Sep. 24, 2011

    This is perhaps the top 5 reason parents come to my office on a daily basis. Often times, teachers don't have the IEP in their classroom, much less know who the special education students are...you are right in that parents have to be proactive and be intentional when it comes to contacting teachers. I have seen kids sit in classrooms for an entire semester without the teacher knowing they had an IEP, much less needed to be pulled out a few days a week for remediation...some of that is the teachers fault and partly falls on the parent.

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